A Slight Change of Plans…

Waterfalls are mesmerizing to me; they can be loud and thunderous or softly flowing trails of water trickling over a multitude of rocks covered with lush carpets of green moss. This weekend, I was in the mood to find the loud and thunderous ones. I originally planned on heading down to Oregon to check out Butte Creek Falls and Upper Butte Creek Falls, as well as try and find Abiqua Falls which is close to the other two. The weather reports looked promising with overcast skies and a slight chance of rain, so I loaded up the car and made the three hour drive to Oregon. The weather continued to stay grey as I approached Mt. Angel and the small town of Scotts Mills, Oregon. However, as my luck would have it, I no more than started up Crooked Finger Road out of Scotts Mills when the sky cleared and by the time I got to the trail head, there wasn’t a cloud in sight. I still walked to Upper Butte Creek Falls and Butte Creek Falls, but photographing them wasn’t going to happen today as they were half in bright sunshine and half in the shadows of the canyon.  So it was time to come up with a new plan and with that, I turned around and headed the car back north.

It was cloudy by the time I got back into Washington, so I decided to make a brief stop at the Cedar Greek Grist Mill just outside of Woodland, Washington.

Built in 1876 by George Woodham and his sons, the Cedar Creek Grist Mill was originally named the Red Bird Mill.

Built in 1876 by George Woodham and his sons, the Cedar Creek Grist Mill was originally named the Red Bird Mill.

Built in 1876, by migrant miller George Woodham, and changed ownership many times through the years before it was purchased by the Washington State Fisheries Department in the 1950s.  It was then leased by the Fort Vancouver Historical Society in 1961 and was succesfully registered as a Historical Place.  In 1980 a non-profit group was formed, The Friends of the Cedar Creek Grist Mill, and work began to rescue the mill from the hands of time and vandals and restore it back to a working mill. 

After visiting the mill, it was time to head out of Cougar and into the Gifford Pinchot National Forrest along Forest Service Road 90 and visit some wateralls.

First up, was Curly Creek Falls, a waterfall plunging 86 feet with not one, but two natural arches spanning it. 

Curly Creek Falls

Curly Creek Falls

Just a bit further down the Lower Lewis River Trail, is Miller Creek Falls, a 66 foot waterfall that falls over the same cliff as Curly Creek Falls.

Miller Creek Falls

Miller Creek Falls

After walking back to the car, I decided to pay a visit to Big Creek Falls as well.  Plunging 113 feet, Big Creek Falls is impressive.  However, due to Mother Nature throwing a temper tantrum, clear vantages of the falls are currently difficult at the moment as a tree has taken out the observation platform.

Big Creek Falls

Big Creek Falls

Mother Nature threw a temper tantrum and sent a tree crashing down onto the observation platform.

Mother Nature threw a temper tantrum and sent a tree crashing down onto the observation platform.

One more brief stop at a pretty little stream and it was time to head the car towards home to wait until the next adventure (which really wasn’t that far away as I went looking for waterfalls again yesterday – photos from which will be coming soon)

Apr272013_0068

Until the next adventure….

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s